Excisting names

Galido

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In my other topic, i have all ready cited (thans google for giving me the correctly name) about creating names. But, mythologie have millions good names. If we give a name of a character who is also a myth, but not like Zeus, but one who's not famous, would the reader like it?

Or, i used used the term: Parama Purusha. Its form the Hindoe. Its nice to take words who exist all ready. But may this?
 

Lord Yuan

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I'm a huge fan of names from mythologies I've never heard of. It often intrigues me to look up the name and then I learn more about something rad. I especially like you used, like use of Hinduism mythology.
 
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Galido

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Not laughing: i look at wikipedia. :) But, if its a good story and its go to the bookshellfs and everybody read it and then they see a name of a god in the Hinduism. Is that a problem or must i ask the permission for using the name?
 

Lord Yuan

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I think if something is ancient it probably falls under public domain. You can't really ask a specific person for permission anyway.

I play tons of video games and those liberally lift characters from Christianity, norse mythology, demonology, nearly everything. However maybe some of them have a more unique twist or new appearance while still alluding to themes of the original character behind the name.
 

Firiath

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I think the only problem with this is that the reader will always associate the character with his namesake - if he/she knows where the name comes from (or if he/she is so intrigued that he/she googles whether there's a meaning behind the name). This could be useful depending on the way your characters are depicted: Calling a barbarian Jesus or a whiny little boy Ares could imply the characters' (or even the story's) satirical nature, for example.
I wouldn't worry that much about copyright or the like, like Yuan said. But always keep in mind what the name says about the character. ;)
 
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Galido

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Yes. I have already think of that. So, a god, is a god. You give a name of him and you know what he is. But for a human, i search for other names :) Or, if it is a very bad person, and the reader knows it from the beginning, i can take an existing name :)
 

c_nebbia

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While the choice of the main characther name is a serious matter (mine is Eothian, as he comes form the Eon family his name should start with Eo-), for minor charachters ( a sergeant, an inn-keeper, a miller) I use a Random Names Generator for fantasy. You can select short names, long names, idiot names, name with vowels, beginning with a specific letter...

This is the link, have fun

http://www.rinkworks.com/namegen/
 

Overread

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To me I'm often not as worried about the name so much as if the name fits the rest of the world. Calling your lead character Bob in a greek based mythological world would seem very wrong for example.

So if you pick your characters name from a specific source then the rest of your world should also fit in line with that source (for at least the people that the lead character comes from). That way the name itself blends into the story and the world and as such doesn't stand out as much.
 
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Galido

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It's the first time im reading that its excist: a name creator :)

Do you give to every person a name and first name?
 

S.J. Faerlind

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Names can be tough to come up with and I agree with Overread: they have to fit the character whether you use an existing one or one you made up yourself. I tend to make mine up myself. I try to use names that reflect the society the character is from and make sure they match the language the character speaks. The name also has to match the character's personality in some way. For example for a fierce warrior-type character, I might pick a name with a few hard consonants in it: "Shulkat" for example. It just doesn't seem to me to be a good fit to name that character "Shulam" instead. Of course if you're writing some kind of humourous parody... that might be funny.... :)
 

JIM

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ok. here are some examples of mythological names used in Harry Potter to show that it's ok

Minerva McGonagall- in Roman mythology, Minerva is the goddess of poetry, wisdom, crafts, and magic. Her Greek counterpart is Athena, or Pallas Athena. Athena served as the patron goddess to many famous Greeks, including Odysseus from Homer's "The Odyssey
Hermoine Granger- In the tragic story of King Menelaus and Helen, Hermoine was Helen's only child. The name Hermoine is derived from Hermes, who was the Greek god of orators, wit, literature, athletes, invention, weights and measurements, and thieves.
Sybill Trelawney- Professor of Divination at Hogwarts, Sybill is known for her outrageous predictions of death and use of unconventional items, such as tea leaves, crystal balls, and star charts. In Greek mythology, Cumaean Sybil was a prophetess at Cumae in Greece. The word sybil means prophetess, which means one who predicts the future. Cumaean Sybil was known for writing on oak leaves (perhaps a predecessor to tea leaves) and leading heroes to the Underworld, or land of the dead.
Argus Filch- a grumpy chaser of rule breakers, Argus Filch is loathed by many of the Hogwarts students. Many would say Filch sees all and always knows when someone is up to no good. The same applies to his Greek namesake, Argus Panoptes. Panoptes was a giant who had one-hundred eyes, enabling him to guard the goddess Io.
Nymphadora- Nymphadora is a member of the dark wizard fighting squad known as the Aurors. Her greatest skill in the series is her being a metamorphmagus, or someone who has the ability to alter her appearance at will. Nymphs are Greek spirits who have a fondness for song and dance and possess the ability to transform, or morph, into trees, flowers, or other natural elements.

re: http://suite101.com/article/the-mythology-of-harry-potter-character-names-a336629
 

Greybeard

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That's a little different though, JIM, since those are still used as given names - albeit rarely - and are used with conventional surnames. David Smith is the guy who lives up the street and doesn't shovel his walk. David is the most famous king of Israel. Different associations.

The only time I've used a mythological name for a character when I wasn't trying to invoke the myth was a warrior I named Mot after an ancient - I think Babylonian - god of war.

I want to use Huwawa/Humpapa and Utnapishtim as names, but I want to do it specifically to invoke the myths. In the world I'm working on now Huwawa is the immortal father of all ogres and lives in a distant forest. I'll have fun turning him into a sympathetic character. Utnapishtim will be the immortal wise man directly from the myth.

I get most of my names from Behind the Name.
 
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