Use of our world in Middle-earth

Discussion in 'Debates' started by Druid of Lûhn, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Druid of Lûhn

    Druid of Lûhn The Little Lamb.

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    This is half of the topic for a research I was doing, and I was told that it would be good to seek others' opinion. So here it is:

    How much do you think Tolkien used his world at that time in Middle-earth, and how do you think the period in which he created it influenced Middle-earth?

    Please reference anything you get from a source (you will figure in the acknowledgements if I use your info)
     
  2. Overread

    Overread Wolfing it up! Staff Member

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    I can't reference sources as such, but if you search on Tolkien based sites I'm sure you'll find loads of info on this particular topic. It's well said that the siege on the city with the white tree (forget its name - the big one in the last film with the huge attack) as its written in the books, was based upon the trench warfare use. It's also widely thought that the great war was a big influence on his wartime views and writing.
     
  3. Druid of Lûhn

    Druid of Lûhn The Little Lamb.

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    I've got loads of info. The point is getting you guys' opinion.
    Thanks for the reply though.

    It's Minas Tirith, and the trench warfare-related one was actually Helm's Deep (the piles of dead, fighting in the night, ...)
     
  4. Overread

    Overread Wolfing it up! Staff Member

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    You sure?
    It has been a long while since I read them (and the films to make ones memory of the films more hazy) but I seem to recall far more being said about the trenches and the shape of them in the Minas Tirith siege over the Helm's Deep one.
     
  5. Druid of Lûhn

    Druid of Lûhn The Little Lamb.

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    This is from reading J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography only a few months ago, reading LotR last July, and seeing them talk about it in the extras of the extended edition of the films.
     
  6. Firiath

    Firiath Halfling barbarian

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    Some parts of The Lord of the Rings were strongly influenced by Anglo-Saxon culture and poetry. Although Anglo-Saxon times ended roughly in the 11th century, I'd still regard this period as part of "his world", as Tolkien was a scholar of medieval England.
    If you only mean the time in which he lived, forget what I said. :D
     
  7. Overread

    Overread Wolfing it up! Staff Member

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    Remember LotR was intended from the outset to be a heavily Anglo-Saxon religious/mythological tale - hence why much of the material is heavily based on Saxon myth and legend. So that time period was certainly a major influence on the writings.
    However I'd say that the people of middleearth are a tiny bit more educated and possibly reflect as slightly greater imposition of regular people over the time period
     
  8. Druid of Lûhn

    Druid of Lûhn The Little Lamb.

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    Middle-earth was created with a linguistic base; every single one of his important names have three sources; most of them an obvious one, usually anglo-saxon or something, but then there are the second and third level names that are reflected in the peoples for example:

    The Rohirrim come from the Éothéod. Eol means horse in Anglo-Saxon, and they are the horse people. -> Level 1
    Éothéod is also like eos, sun in greek, and throughout the entire novel, the Rohirrim act in ways closely linked to the sun, and speak much of the sun. -> Level 2
    (Can't remember level 3 right now)

    That's the sort of stuff I'm working on.

    And it's not whether it's his time; more like inspiration from his life as well.