Tragedy at Saskatchewan Centennial Airshow

Discussion in 'News & Announcements' started by Senekha, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. Senekha

    Senekha <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><

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    I know this is a couple weeks after the event, but I"ve just now had the time to post about it. I don't know if anyone else has already posted about it - if so, just lock this thread.

    A week before last Sunday, I was in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan for the Saskatchewan Centennial Airshow. It was a great show - f-14 tomcats, f-15 eagles, f-18 hornets and superhornets were among the different exhibits.

    One of the acts was a father-son act. Jimmy Franklin and his son Kyle performed an amazing act, where Jimmy would fly his plane, the World's only Jet-powered Waco, in loops and dives and Kyle would perform stunts such as walking along the wings and standing on top of the plane as it shot skywards - without a parachute. The croud loved the act.

    The second-last act, one which utilized Franklin's plane and Tommy Younkin's Samson biplane, as well as another plane and a "Shock Wave" Jet Truck, they reenacted a WWII dogfight, with little choreography. They called their act the "X-Team, Masters of Disaster".

    Tragically, disaster managed to win the day - Franklin and Younkin's planes collided, causing the planes to dissintegrate.

    I was in the front row of the airshow, not far from the site of the accident. Just after the collision, the audience of 20 000 people was dead silent. As the pilots, in previous acts, had talked to the audience through radio speakers, creating a sense of friendship, this was an extremely sad day.

    My heart goes out to all who knew the two pilots, especially Kyle and other family members.

    Here is a link to an article about the incident, with biographies on both pilots: http://www.aviation.ca/content/view/1030/
     
  2. Boadicea

    Boadicea Warrior Queen

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    That's terrible! I didn't hear about it before. That's the problem with stunts like that, it's a crowd-pleaser, but there's often a price to pay.
     
  3. Senekha

    Senekha <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><

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    Yes, and they're not worth the price.
     
  4. Adina

    Adina <img src=http://www.thefantasyforum.com/images/nub

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    I hadn't heard of this Sen. It's definately sad to hear. So many stunts such as that one are far more dangerous than the crowd seem to think. As long as they enjoy it right?
    My sympathies to all those affected by this accident.
     
  5. Skyanide

    Skyanide The Big Meanie Staff Member

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    Flying is something that people like to do, dream about, and very few people have an opportunity to realize that dream.

    I'm fortunate to have the means to do so, I've had my license almost two years now.

    So, while I can't speak for the two pilots that died, I can almost guarantee that flying was something they had a calling to do, something they loved, and something that if they had a chance to do again, they would in a heartbeat. Nobody put a gun to their heads, they were doing what they loved to do.

    Just like any other sport, be it car racing, parachuting, boating, what have you, there is always a danger. You can die anytime, 60 years or 60 seconds from now.

    I would rather make my exit in an airplane stunt run afoul than be hit by a drunk driver while walking on a sidewalk. Sometimes it's not when you go but how you go.

    My sympathies to the pilots' families.