Terry Brooks

Discussion in 'General Books' started by whitetrash, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. whitetrash

    whitetrash Trailerpark Pimp

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    well i wont say the mastery of lotr but there are many great writers of fantasy out there but brooks just happens to be my fav problley he is what got me started in the fantasy world
     
  2. Wing Rider

    Wing Rider Psychotic Cybernetica

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    Same, Sword of Shannara got me into fantasy in the first place :p
     
  3. Liadan

    Liadan Insert Title Here

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    Ditto to Elladan - as I've stated before, I've read most of Terry Brooks works, and enjoyed them. I just happen to prefer other authors. :) But to each their own.
     
  4. Warlock Lord

    Warlock Lord I am a Fashion Statement

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    same here, brooks also got me into fantasy... hail...
     
  5. whitetrash

    whitetrash Trailerpark Pimp

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    now we are judgeing differnt typs of fantasy books here Elladan brooks is fantasy and martin and jordan are epic fantaSY BOOKS i never read jordan but most likely will and im reading maryian right now and he is great brooks is more of light fantsy
    here are types of fantasy some one posted at my forum the nuthouse
    While there is always much debate as to what constitutes a certain kind of fantasy, I pulled this list, so have at it.

    Alternate History

    For more details on this topic, see Alternate history.

    Althought many forms of alternate history are classified as science fiction, alternate histories where magic works or fantastic creatures abound are classified as fantasy.

    The characteristics that separate it from historical fantasy and contemporary fantasy are that the history has both clear differences and clear connections to history and geography.

    * Randall Garrett's "Lord Darcy" series
    * Keith Roberts's Pavane
    * Poul Anderson's Operation Chaos

    [edit]

    Bangsian fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Bangsian fantasy.

    Bangsian fantasy is named for John Kendrick Bangs, whose late 19th- and early 20th-century Associated Shades series of novels deals with the afterlives of various famous people. Frequently used are the Underworld/Limbo/Purgatory ("neutral"), Elysium/Nirvana/Heaven ("good"), and Erebus/Gehenna/Hell ("bad").

    * Inferno, Larry Niven (1976)
    * Heroes in Hell, C.J. Cherryh and Janet Morris (1986)
    * God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian, Kurt Vonnegut (1999)

    [edit]

    Comic fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Comic fantasy.

    This sub-genre parodies the above ideas as well as ideas outside the genre, often in a postmodern manner. A peculiarly early example of this genre is the aforementioned Gulliver's Travels. It might also include the so-called "worst science fiction story ever published" The Eye of Argon.

    * Bored of the Rings, Henry N. Beard and Douglas C. Kenney (1969)
    * The Eye of Argon, Jim Theis (1970)
    * A Spell for Chameleon, Piers Anthony (1977)
    * Hordes of the Things, Andrew Marshall and John Lloyd (1980)
    * The Colour of Magic, Terry Pratchett (1983)

    [edit]

    Contemporary fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Contemporary fantasy.

    This fantasy comprises stories set in the putative real world or consensus reality in contemporary times, in which, the story reveals, magic or magical creatures exist, such as vampires or, as in the Highlander films and television series, immortals.

    All the fantasy elements in a contemporary fantasy must exist in, or at least intrude into, the real world. Fantasy stories where the characters leave the real world for a fantasy world, and the real world contains nothing magical except, perhaps, the portal, are high fantasy. On the other hand, their existence must be secret enough that a reader can be convinced that by one means or another, the fantasy elements could hide or be hidden from history, the media, and the overwhelming majority of people. If the fantasy elements are so clear as to make the majority of people aware of them, the story becomes Alternate History.

    * Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Joss Whedon (original 1992, re-invented 1997)
    * Neverwhere, Neil Gaiman (1996)
    * Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, J. K. Rowling (1997)
    * King Rat, China Miéville (1998)

    [edit]

    Dark fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Dark fantasy.

    Dark fantasy in this context refers to stories that focus on elements usually found in the horror genre but which take place in a setting more alike sword and sorcery or high fantasy. Dark fantasy includes "grittier" fantasy, conducted in settings which represent the brutality of the medieval period more truly than the traditionally idealised representations of conventional fantasy, generally with a dash of supernatural horror. It may or may not take place in its own fantasy world.

    More generally, dark fantasy may be used as a synonym for supernatural horror, to distinguish horror stories that contain elements of the supernatural from those that do not. For example, a story about a mummy or vampire rising from the grave would be most likely described as dark fantasy, supernatural horror, or horror fantasy, while a story about a serial killer is simply horror. In this sense, there is a considerable overlap between dark fantasy and contemporary fantasy.

    Perhaps the most definitive works of dark fantasy are those of H.P. Lovecraft, whose blend of fantasy and horror (and to a lesser extent, science fiction) cannot reliably be placed in either genre, but whose fiction has both directly and indirectly been massively influential throughout nearly all of the fantasy genre.

    * Vampire Hunter D, Hideyuki Kikuchi (1983)
    * Berserk, Kentaro Miura (1989)

    [edit]

    Erotic fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Erotic fantasy.

    Erotic fantasy utilizes erotica in a fantasy setting.

    This subgenre can, in fact, overlap with almost every other subgenre, since its distinguishing traits are not the fantatical elements or setting that distinguish the others.
    [edit]

    Fairytale fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Fairytale fantasy.

    Fairytale fantasy is a diverse subgenre. It includes modern fairytales, such as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and The Hobbit, as well as erotic, violent, or otherwise more adult-oriented retellings of classic fairytales, and retellings of fairy tales with plot, characterization, and settings fleshed out to standards normal for fantasy.

    Fairytale fantasies are distinguished from other subgenres by their heavy use of motifs, and often plots, from folklore. They sometimes ignore the standards of world-building common to fantasy as blithely as the folktales from which they derive, though not always; stories that use a high fantasy, contemporary, or historical setting, with the world-building thus entailed, may also be considered part of those genres.

    * George MacDonald's The Princess and the Goblin (1872)
    * James Thurber's The 13 Clocks (1950)
    * Robin McKinley's Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast (1978)
    * Tanith Lee's Red As Blood, or Tales from the Sisters Grimmer (1983)
    * Patricia Wrede's Snow White and Rose Red (1989)

    [edit]

    Heroic fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Heroic fantasy.

    A subgenre touching epic fantasy on one hand and sword-and-sorcery on the other.
    [edit]

    High fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see High fantasy.

    The term high fantasy generally refers to fantasy that depicts an epic struggle between good and evil in an fantasy world, whether independent of or parallel to ours. The moral concepts in such tales take on objective status, and are not relative to the one making the judgement.

    The moral tone and high stakes -- usually world-shaking -- separates this genre from sword and sorcery, while the degree to which the world is not based on a real-world history separates it from historical fantasy.

    * The Worm Ouroboros, E. R. Eddison (1922)
    * The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, C. S. Lewis (1950)
    * The Fellowship of the Ring, J. R. R. Tolkien (1954)
    * Lord Foul's Bane, Stephen R. Donaldson (1977)
    * The Sword of Shannara, Terry Brooks (1977)
    * The Eye of the World, Robert Jordan (1990)
    * Record of Lodoss War, Ryo Mizuno (1990)

    [edit]

    Historical fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Historical fantasy.

    Historical fantasy takes two distinct forms. One encompasses stories set in the historical past but with fantasy elements introduced, much as contemporary fantasy is set in the present. The other is set in a created fantasy world that closely parallels our own, with recognisable analogs for countries, historical events or historical personages.

    * Eagle in the Snow, Wallace Breem (1970)
    * The Sarantine Mosaic, Guy Gavriel Kay (1998–2000)
    * Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, Susanna Clarke (2004)
    * A Game of Thrones, George R. R. Martin (1996)

    [edit]

    Celtic Fantasy

    Within the genre, further subgenres arise when a given historical era is popular. For instance, many fantasy settings have been in, or inspired by, Dark Age Celtic cultures have lead to the name of "Celtic fantasy."

    * Katherine Kerr, the Deverry series
    * Teresa Edgerton's the Green Lion Trilogy

    [edit]

    Steampunk

    Fantasy Steampunk is another subgenre of historical fantasy, being set in the Victorian or Edwardian eras, although certain technological features must also be present to label it as steampunk.
    [edit]

    Low fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Low fantasy.

    Low fantasy is not a proper subgenre as such, but a catch-all term employed to describe works of fantasy literature that tries not to emphasise magic. It is almost always placed in an antagonistic relationship with the more well-defined high fantasy genre, emphasising realism and a more cynical worldview. As such, it mostly tend to overlap with Dark fantasy. It often questions the way traditional fantasy deals with good and evil, making it even more closely connected with dark fantasy.
    [edit]

    Mannerpunk

    For more details on this topic, see Mannerpunk.

    Mannerpunk, or fantasy of manners, is the fantasy genre's arena for the comedy of manners. Its worlds involve elaborately complex social hierarchies, and its plots revolve around its characters' interactions within those hierarchies in the traditions of Jane Austen or Anthony Hope.

    Many fantasy of manners could, by the setting, be classified as alternate history, high fantasy, or historical fantasy. The subgenre is marked out by tone and plot, and the centrality of etiquette to the characters' negiotations.

    * Swordspoint, Ellen Kushner (1987)
    * The Queen's Necklace, Teresa Edgerton
    * The Death of the Necromancer, Martha Wells

    [edit]

    Mythic fantasy

    Often very loosely based in traditional mythology, using familiar mythological personages or deities. This is in contrast to many other forms of fantasy (with the usual exception of fairytale fantasy), such as the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, which generally invent their own mythologies and volunteer entirely new pantheons, or attempt to disguise traditional mythology with made-up names.

    * American Gods, Neil Gaiman (2001)

    [edit]

    Romantic fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Romantic fantasy.

    The plots of romantic fantasies centre upon a romantic relationship between the protagonists, and the plots or settings include fantastical elements. Romantic fantasy has been published both as fantasy and as romance.

    This subgenre can, in fact, overlap with almost every other subgenre, since its distinguishing traits are not the fantatical elements or setting that distinguish the others.
    [edit]

    Science fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Science fantasy.

    Fantasy and science fiction jointly share the subgenre called science fantasy, which has many of the trappings of science fiction, such as space travel and laser guns, but also contains significant elements that bear more resemblance to magic than science or in some other way draw more from fantasy than from science fiction. The best known example of science fantasy is the Star Wars series of films and books, set aboard spaceships and on alien planets but featuring swashbuckling knights, princesses in distress, a dark sorcerer who has enslaved the galaxy, a mystical source of magical power called the Force, and even an opening line that is a variant of "Once upon a time": A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.

    * Star Wars
    * Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light
    * The Book of the New Sun, Gene Wolfe
    * Scrapped Princess, Ichiro Sakaki

    [edit]

    Dying Earth fiction

    For more details on this topic, see Dying Earth subgenre.

    A subgenre of Science Fantasy, distinguished by its settings in the far-distant future.

    * Dying Earth series, Jack Vance
    * Viriconium, M. John Harrison

    [edit]

    Series fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Series fantasy.

    Series fantasy is a series of novels by many different authors that take place in the same fantasy world. This world is typically one created for role-playing game (i.e. a campaign setting) like Dungeons & Dragons. These novels provide background color for gamers as well as a familiar fantasy setting for a variety of authors to use as a setting for their story.

    * Dragonlance, various authors (1984 - present)
    * Forgotten Realms, various authors (1987 - present)
    * Magic: The Gathering, various authors (1993 - present)
    * Dark Sun, various authors (date?)

    [edit]

    Superhero fantasy

    For more details on this topic, see Superhero.

    Superhero fantasy began in American comic books, evolving into a combination of science fantasy and contemporary fantasy. That is, it is a genre that is typically set in the contemporary world in where all fantastic concepts from extra-terrestrials and futuristic technology to magic and classic mythological beings potentially co-exist. The feature characters, however, are costumed heroes often endowed with fantastic abilities, skills or equipment.

    * Lois & Clark: A Superman Novel (1996), C. J. Cherryh
    * Wild Cards, George R. R. Martin (date)
    * Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light

    [edit]

    Sword and sorcery

    For more details on this topic, see Sword and sorcery.

    Inspired primarily by the works of Robert E. Howard, especially Conan the Barbarian, and by popular role-playing games such as Dungeons & Dragons. Sword and sorcery is more concerned with immediate physical threats and action than high fantasy, distinguishing the two genres. Further, sword and sorcery, in contrast to high fantasy, tends to portray amoral protagonists and/or worlds--there are rarely objective values, or any sort of cosmic justice. Even when the protagonists act morally, and do incidental good deeds along the way, the usual protagonist's motivation is self-interest.

    * Conan the Barbarian series Robert E. Howard
    * Jirel of Joiry series, C. L. Moore
    * Neverwhere, Richard Corben (1968)
    * Slayers, Hajime Kanzaka (date)
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2006
  6. Warlock Lord

    Warlock Lord I am a Fashion Statement

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    good list... ive seen it in the last thread though...

    amazingly... there are some fantasy genres i dont like...
     
  7. Wing Rider

    Wing Rider Psychotic Cybernetica

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    I would like Edding's fantasy stuff more if his characters weren't so smug and superior about everything...
     
  8. ~Elladan~

    ~Elladan~ A Elbereth Gilthoniel

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    Not particularly clear why I've been quoted in this context ~ the list you quote puts Jordan, Tolkien & Brooks in the 'high fantasy' category and Martin in 'historical'. All 4 authors have published series ~ so how/what determines whether it is 'epic'?

    My own simple point was that I personally do not think Brooks is in the same class as any of the other 3 ~ Brooks works are 'light' (using your own descriptive) which to me means 'superficial' which is the point I've been making all along. Brooks is an enjoyable enough read but not one I'd return to regularly, or consider a classic :)
     
  9. whitetrash

    whitetrash Trailerpark Pimp

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    Yesi did say light but thepoint iwas trying tomakeis you are judging terrywork against epicwritters works
     
  10. ~Elladan~

    ~Elladan~ A Elbereth Gilthoniel

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    I would have thought this comparison was quite reasonable as Brooks' Shannara series is comparable in length to these 'epic writers works', were written before at least some of them and were presumably written for the same(ish) fantasy audience. Your comment suggests that you yourself don't think Brooks' books compare favourably to Tolkien, Martin or Jordan? Unless Brooks is perhaps aiming his books at a younger audience? ~ If so what authors do you think are at the same sort of level as Brooks? :D

    I'd mention again that I agree Brooks is an enjoyable 'light' read :D
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2006
  11. Wing Rider

    Wing Rider Psychotic Cybernetica

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    I was under the impression that Brooks is a writer of epic fantasy...how more epic can you get? Though I can see why you'd call his books a light read.
     
  12. whitetrash

    whitetrash Trailerpark Pimp

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    yousee what imean and you know i'm a big brooks fan he is my all time fav writter
     
  13. Warlock Lord

    Warlock Lord I am a Fashion Statement

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    hes only winding us up lads... :)

    he likes them as much as we do... he just cant come to terms with that... :)
     
  14. Wing Rider

    Wing Rider Psychotic Cybernetica

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    Ah well, he'll learn soon. You cannot deny that Brooks is the master of fantasy for very long in any case. :D
     
  15. Roland

    Roland Go Horse's Go

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    Been denying it since I last spoke to you all and still haven't changed my mind :D. I've even read one of his books to have a look at the 'master' to me he seems fairly standard, nothing brilliant but nothing awful(like Eragon)
     
  16. Liadan

    Liadan Insert Title Here

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    Lol, just had to comment... "One of the Pack," eh?
     
  17. Roland

    Roland Go Horse's Go

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    :p Felt like a change lol, and I did join the Grey Alliance
     
  18. Warlock Lord

    Warlock Lord I am a Fashion Statement

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    LIKE ERAGON!!! thats unfair... thats like comparing the simpsons to a bad soap... like eastenders...

    i know you didnt mean that... :)
     
  19. whitetrash

    whitetrash Trailerpark Pimp

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    That was a low blow Brooks has done so much for fantsay over the last 20 plus years he has been in the game
     
  20. Warlock Lord

    Warlock Lord I am a Fashion Statement

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    thats true...
     
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