Sword Care and Paul Chen practical Viking/knightley/hand and a half

Discussion in 'General Weapons & Armour' started by Gundar, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Gundar

    Gundar New Member

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    How often should you put oil on your sword? (Some kind of high carbon steel)

    -If kept in scabbard (If it really should be kept in a scabbard?)

    -If its kept in some kind of cloth?





    Is there anyone who know anything about these swords, are they crap or what?


    -Paul Chen-Practical Viking

    -Paul Chen-Practical Knightly

    -Paul Chen-Practical Hand and a half
     
  2. Patrick Kelly

    Patrick Kelly New Member

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    Oiling your sword depends upon how often you handle it. A quick wipe down withan oily rag after every handling is fine and don't overdo it. Many people seem to think a sword needs to be doused in oil on a weekly basis. Any lightweight oil, RemOil, sewing oil, etc. will do fine. I use Ballistol.

    The Paul Chen practical series aren't exactly "crap" because a blanket statement like that fails to put the subject in it's proper context. Are they the equal of a nice done custom or highend production piece? No. But then again they aren't very expensive either. They lack nearly all of the subtle proportions and geometries that make a sword a sword, but you won't find those attributes in any other sword in a comparable price range.

    The practical series do suffer from things like erratic heat treatment, shoddy hilt construction, etc., as do many of the Hanwei offerings. What they will give you is a cheap swordlike object to play with.
     
  3. Gundar

    Gundar New Member

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    Ok, thanks
     
  4. Gundar

    Gundar New Member

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    But then again, should the sword be kept in the scabbard?
     
  5. stevenlink1

    stevenlink1 Knight of Hyrule

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    I don't know the answer to that particular question, but I just wanted to say that I have owned the Paul Chen Viking broadsword and it served me very well, surviving brutal treatment before eventually breaking off at the hilt. My brother has owned the knightly sword, but its hilt fell apart after a few sparring matches. Generally, heavier swords last longer (all other things set equal of course).
     
  6. Patrick Kelly

    Patrick Kelly New Member

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    A properly constructed sword is not heavy (relative to the design) but it is durable, if used in the correct fashion and of good construction. Paul Chen swords in the higher price bracket are questionable in their quality and that decreases in relation to the price. They are manufactuerd on a very large production scale in the Hanwei factory and as such they don't really get much individual quality control. On a production level of that scale it's very easy for defective samples to slip through. The only good thing about the Practical series is they are cheap, so when they fail they aren't hard to replace.

    A sword really shouldn't be left in its scabbard for an extended period of time, for several reasons. Moisture can get trapped within the scabbard and on many cheaper scabbards the wood may be a bit acidic, both can lead to rust. By "extened period" I mean you shouldn't toss it in the closet and forget about it for months or years. If one of my swords is ever in its scabbard for any length of time, from travel etc., it gets wiped down every several days.

    Decorative swords made from stainless steel, and perhaps with scabbards that have plastic cores, aren't really susceptable to this.
     
  7. Master Wrath

    Master Wrath Writer

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    I know I'm bringing up an old post, but I bought a functional katana and wakizashi from a store in Montreal about two years ago. I rarely take them out of the scabbard (maybe once every 3 months) and than only for a few minutes. Should I be oiling them at all?
     
  8. Mububban

    Mububban Administrator Staff Member

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    Well if it's been 2 years and you've had no problems, I'd say not to worry. CLimate plays a big part, there's obviously a huge difference between a dry desert location and a humid tropical location when causing rust, especially in storage.

    Out of interest, what sort of climate do you get in Ontario?
     
  9. stevenlink1

    stevenlink1 Knight of Hyrule

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    That's what I love about living in Arizona. Constant dryness! I know everyone says this, but I plan to make swords when I grow old enough and wealthy enough for the proper facilities. In accordance with that ambition, I can't think of a better place to be than good old Phoenix Arizona. The only problem is, not many people around here are too interested in swords. I'm still desperately trying to find a fencing club to join.
     
  10. Mububban

    Mububban Administrator Staff Member

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    Ask around at your local university sports centre, they often have fencing clubs.

    When the time comes to learn bladesmithing, try contacting the American Bladesmith Society.
     
  11. stevenlink1

    stevenlink1 Knight of Hyrule

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    I recently went out and bought a Dremel, which I suppose means that I can practice carving hilts, and even wooden blades if it so pleases my fancy.
     
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