Quiver

Discussion in 'Historical Re-enactment' started by Harrison, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    I think there are some rules that allow them to use generators.
     
  2. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    AH, so it's THOSE Amish! Actually I believe there are different sects of Amish. Some are very strict and don't use phones or anything mechanical, like cars, etc. Then there are those who stay true to their religion but use some modern conveniences like motors, phones, etc. Sounds like your leather suppliers are of the latter group.
     
  3. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Yep, that's what they are. Some of them actually have phone booths that look like outhouses outside their houses.
     
  4. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    DISCLAIMER: Cheesy goodness figured this out long ago, hopefully you have too - wicked sense of humor.

    I guess that puts a new twist on the saying "have to see a man about a horse".
     
  5. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    I have another question about the quiver. Does the bottom go on so the flaps are visible from the underside of the quiver so it's easier put the lace in?
     
  6. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    Yes. Fold the flaps down, then lace it on. When you're finished the bottom should recess the height/distance of the length of the flaps. Saying it differently, if you think about a paper cup, the bottom is slightly raise from the actual bottom of the cup, as measured by the sides. Same idea here. I'll admit, the first time I made this quiver design I turned the flaps up which meant I had to do the lacing from the inside. NO! NOT FUN! If you turn the flaps down you can lace the bottom on entirely from the outside - that is, you don't have to reach into the quiver to do the lacing. I usually lace the quiver starting at the top, then have enough lace to split the remainder at the bottom to lace the bottom on. That is, I can lace the entire quiver with one piece of lace. The bottom flaps may slightly overlap. No biggie. Nobody sees them anyway. After I lace up the quiver, then I add the straps. I do this by using a second piece of lace for each of the three straps - 2 bottom straps and one over-the-shoulder strap.
     
  7. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    That's what I thought.
     
  8. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    I just made an awesome discovery, my mom has a little thing for embossing for her scrapbooks that I can use for depressing intaglios into my leather. I'm gonna use this to carve an elvish leaf design around my next pair of vambraces and possibly my quiver.
     
  9. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    I have a buddy in Florida who does some of the most detailed carving I have ever seen. He makes most of his own tools because he can't buy tools small enough. He buys large nails, then shapes the tip to the desired tool shape. I have made tools out of wooden dowels. They don't last as long as metal tools but the also work. In period they often made their tools out of orange wood. Small grain and medium hardness. You might consider that as well.
     
  10. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Do you do your tooling before or after you put the finishing coat on your leather? Also, what do you use to apply your dye to your leather? I've used a brush so far but it's just so hard to get the dye to be nice and even.
     
  11. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    I do all the tooling/carving prior to applying the finish. The leather takes up the water, casing, better without a finish, and sometimes the finish would change if water were applied afterwards, as in tooling after finish. This would be particularly true for finishes like antiques which are water based. I have also found that attempting to tool after the finish is applied loads up the face of the tools. i.e. they become sticky and the finish often comes off on the tool. Stamping first when using antiques as the finish is mandatory as the tool leaves the depressions that the anituqing gets into to highlight the effect/pattern.

    As for application I usually use cotton swabs as sold by Leather Factory or Tandy. Sometimes for large areas I use these new sponge brushes. For a large area you have to work fast, even and keep the brush and area wet. It's a bit tricky. I usually don't get to fussy about slight variations in color. This gets smoothed out when I apply the Atom Wax or Super Sheene coat. These two finishes re-dissolve the dye and help to smooth it out. With the Atom Wax I have actually poured a little in another bottle then added alcohol dye of the color I want the finished project to be. Then I hand rub in the atom wax with dye mixture on using several coats. The result is a very nice deep shine.

    For a great deal of my work though, I actually paint on the dye. That is, I use paint brushes to apply the dye. In the gallery I have several belts with multi-colors on them. It is my choice to use a dye if I can get the color I want. I use paint as a second choice, as it tends to chip and/or flake off with use. As such, I wind up painting the dye into the very small areas on lots of my projects.
     
  12. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    What are some examples of projects that you have used super sheen on? I'd like to see the results before I buy some. Also, I was looking at the Satin Sheen and it said that it was to spray on horses...but you said that it was for leather? I don't quite understand.
     
  13. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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  14. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Forgot. Satin Sheene is made by Tandy and is for use on leather.
     
  15. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    But on Tandy it says that it's just for spraying on horses for shows and stuff.
     
  16. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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  17. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Oh, yep. We were looking at different things. I was looking in Conditioners and Tans.
     
  18. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    I've got my paper template all cut out in wrapping paper because it was the only thing big enough around the house. I taped it all up including the bottom and it fits great. I'm gonna get some poster board and then trace and cut it in that. I haven't made the paper straps yet but I'm gonna at some point.
     
  19. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Okay, I've been trying to make a poster board cut out of the quiver but I'm having some trouble getting the bottom to fit. Any tips, Christophe?
     
  20. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    Not quite sure how to respond. You said everything fit when you made it out of paper but now it dosen't with the poster board. Leather is much more forgiving than poster board. Sorry if some of this seems obvious but.... The flaps on the bottom go on the inside of the quiver tube, pointing down. Often they will slightly overlap each other as you go around the tube. Sometimes the "flat" part of the bottom winds up actually being slightly crowned. That is, crested upwards from the quiver bottom. This actually works out OK as when the arrows are dropped in it cushions them. The quiver tube should overlap only about 1 inch when you form it into a tube. If you find the bottom is still too tight, just make the cuts in towards the middle for the flaps slightly longer. This will make the flaps longer but reduce the diameter of the bottom piece. Let me know if that helps.