Quiver

Discussion in 'Historical Re-enactment' started by Harrison, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Hello again.

    I am on the brink of buying a longbow. I was wondering if you guys have any patters and/or tips for making a quiver. Thank you in advance for any help you can give me.

    ~Gamigar~
     
  2. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    What type of quiver did you have in mind? A simple side quiver is basically just a leather tube with two attachment points connecting to a common ring. You affix the ring to your belt so that the arrows, nock end, face forward. Some folks choose to wear this style quiver on their bow side, others on the draw side (my preference). My stick up quiver in the gallery is an example.

    Hip pocket quivers, designed to fit inside the back pocket of your pants, is nothing more than what the name implies, a leather pocket. It's just a bit smaller than the standard back pocket of a pair of jeans. Of course its longer so it sticks out the top. Very simple to make.

    I have a picture of a model that is a variation of the hip pocket called the hipster in the gallery. This style hangs off your belt. Simple to make. It's made like a gun holster.

    My personal favorite is the back style. I have used back styles with two over the shoulder straps like a back pack, but I prefer the single shoulder strap with the fork in front. This is like my Elven quiver in the gallery. The second strap in front holds the quiver in place better than a single strap does.

    I also have a picture of a quiver patterned after a 15th century Italian quiver. I set it up so it could hang off a belt like the side quiver above, but also made an over the shoulder strap for it.

    As for patterns, if you choose to make the simple side quiver, get some poster board and make a tube out of it. Then cut the top and bottom flat and slice straight down one side. When you open it up you have your pattern. I choose about a 1 inch overlap for my quivers, but if you used 6 oz or heavier leather you could butt sew the seam. If you choose to overlap the seam be sure you make the paper tube a little larger in diameter. Then when you do the oever lap the diameter of the resulting quiver will be what you intended.

    If you would like to do any of the above quivers, let me know. I have patterns for all of them. I can scan the hipster and hip pocket but the Elven style poses a problem. My scanner is not large enough to handle it. I may be able to copy it at the office supply store, reduce it and post the pattern. You would then have to enlarge it to size.

    As for leather weight, I would recommend 6 - 7 oz. I've used heavier but it seems unnceccessary and is heavy. A somewhat flexible quiver is OK I think. For a finishing touch you can put a disk of sheep's wool inside on the bottom and around the top. This helps to quiet the arrows when you move. You can use synthetic sheep's wool fabric you can get at JoAnn's or any fabric store. Cheaper. I've been lining the inside of my arm guards with the synthetic wool for extra padding and comfort.
     
  3. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    I just uploaded my newest quiver to the gallery. I get bored with stuff and make new stuff for me.
     
  4. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Thanks a lot. I need to think about which one I want to make. I'll back to you on the subject.
     
  5. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Okay, I want something like the basketweave quiver but with the proper straps to hang on my back like the elvish one.
     
  6. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    You got it. I'll have to take the original pattern down to the office supply store to make a reduced copy of it. The Elven straps are simple. Basically one strap that comes over your shoulder then a fitting in mid chest for the forked strap. Both straps attach at the bottom of the quiver. I lace them into the same holes I use to lace the bottom of the quiver on. The shoulder strap is laced into the seam laces that hold the quiver together in it's tube shape. You may have noticed that the strap flares to about 2 1/2 inchs wide at the top and tapers to 1 inch. I've been using 3/4 inch three way harness fittings so I have to further reduce the width of the strap to attach it to the fitting. (I did not like the bulky look of the 1 inch fitting!) Basically this means you now have more "realestate" to work with. The Moors had a term for this. Basically it meant the abhorence of an open space. That's why they did things of such fantastic detail. I just call it a canvas waiting for something!

    I'll post here when I get the pattern loaded into the gallery.
     
  7. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Thanks. Hey, this kind of off topic but how do you get the bottoms on your mugs?
     
  8. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    Oh that's easy - they come that way! Not much use without a bottom. My adult beverage of choice would just fall onto the ground. What a waste!!! HAHAHAHAHA Sorry, I had to.

    The bottoms are sewn on. The process is to sew on the cover while the tankard is inside. This way I can pull the cover up snug and it form fits the tankard shape. Then I pop the tankard out and sew on the bottom. While the whole project is still damp, I put the tankard back inside and let it dry. Then I pop the tankard out again and sew on the handle. Put the tankard back in the leather cover and do the finish work. From start to finish each tankard has about 20 minutes work in it not counting the tooling and finishes applied. But that 20 minutes takes at least 2 days - drying times and highly dependent upon weather conditions!
     
  9. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Oh, I wasn't aware that they were just covers.
     
  10. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    OK, you asked. Here's the evolutionary history of what has become known as the Christophe Tankard. When I went to my first SCA event, the lady that introduced us told us that we had to be "period". We had to have names, garb (clothes), etc. She loaned my a leather tankard that was "period". Period tankards were simply leather tubes with either leather bottoms or wooden bottoms. (Little known fact - If you have an early English personna it is incorrect to use a ceramic tankard. England does not have clay sufficient for firing or making cermaic anything! It had to be importened from the contenent/Europe.) To keep the tankard from leaking, it is coated inside with bee's wax. Very period. Problem is, anything, adult beverage of choice, soda, water, anything you put in it tastes of bee's wax! OK, I could live with that, but........ On Sunday morning, as we were packing up, I went to the feast hall to get myself a tankard of coffee. Don't get ahead of me here! I took one drink. It took be two weeks to get all the bee's wax out of my mustache! So one day, we were living in Florida at the time, while sitting out by the pool, I was looking at my double walled plastic mug I was drinking water out of and began to think. I could just cut the handle off and cover it with leather. Viola! A "period" tankard. And so, the Christophe tankard was born. In Trimaris, the Florida kingdom of the SCA, many have these tankards and refer to them as Christophe Tankards. A name they came up with, not me. In fact, blowing my own horn here, they have become a sought after item. With the double walled plastic tankard inside, in Florida, I can pack the tankard with ice, pour in a soda, and still have ice in the tankard two hours latter. Even during the summer! Try that with a "real" leather tankard or a clay tankard. Ain't going to happen!!! My tankards have been left on car roofs when the driver drove off and survived. The only tankard that was actually broken was a young gent who had it hanging off his belt when he was getting checked out by the marshal. The marshal asked him if he was going to take the takard off his belt before fighting. He said yes, then proceeded to walk straight onto the lyst. The first blow - bamm, cracked tankard! Well, duhh!!!!! I just retired my first I made for myself after 7 years of service. Got tired of the design. I do that. I've got several pictures of them in the gallery.

    Since then I've progressed to covering shot glasses, Altoid boxes for a very cool Roman dice game. One of my favorites is an acrylic beer glass. Those tall slim waisted glasses they serve beer in. It was difficult to get the curve just right but it feels wonderful in the hand. I also made some out of plastic glasses that had "bands" on them so that they just "fit" right into you hand. Very nice in the hand! I prefer plastic so that if you drop it it doesn't break. Besides, if anyone is close enough to look inside your tankard and see it is plastic inside and they are stupid enough to comment, they are also close enough to bop! I have also covered cigar boxes lined inside with velvet or suede as jewlery boxes. Gave one to a sitting king. Upon stepping down his queen and him nearly went to blows over who was going to keep the box!
     
  11. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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  12. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Yeah, cool now. But a bee's wax coated mustache? Not cool......... Can we say OWWW!!!!
     
  13. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    Just uploaded patterns for the Elven style quiver. I put notes on the patterns as well as in the descriptions in the gallery. You may want to adjust the strap lengths to better fit you. The trickiest part of this quiver is remembering which way it's going to go when you trace the pattern onto the leather. Remember, you mark on the inside of the leather, so the backside of the pattern becomes the outside of the quiver. Same thing with the arm guard.

    The pattern will require some hardware. For the quiver, 2 one inch buckles, and one three way harness hardware. These have three rectangular "loops" joined in the middle with a roundish part. You can see this on the Elven quiver in the gallery. Legolas used a cool Elven buckle here. For the arm guard you will need three 1/2 or 3/4 in buckles. Of course rivets as well. I lace my quivers using standard leather lacing. The kind sold as leather shoe laces. If you choose to line the quiver top and bottom with sheep's wool, the line on the quiver body pattern shows where to cut. I use a synthetic sheep's wool on the inside of my arm guards for comfort as well as extra padding (hopefully I won't smack my arm that hard!).

    Good luck, post pictures, and if you have questions, just ask.
     
  14. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Thanks.
     
  15. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    I see that you coloured your leather for the quiver. Luckily I can buy leather already that colour from some amish people up by my grandparents' house. I can get a roughly 60" by 15" piece for $80. Thanks for patterns again. For the quiver bottom it says actual size. Is it supposed to be about 3" across not including the flaps?
     
  16. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    Yes, the bottom is about 3 inches across not including the flaps. BTW each flat has two holes punched in it, side by side. They will then match up with the hole marks on the bottom of the quiver body.

    Pre-colored leather is OK as you will be stamping the leather. When you do stamping you can get good results without dampening the leather. I would cut the edge of the leather. If it is a greyish color then it's chrome tanned leather. This type of leather is semi-water resistent and usually quite difficult to stamp. You can't carve it though, as you can never dampen it. For tooling you need veg tanned leather, which when cut is a light beige color.
     
  17. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    No, it's not gray. It's a slightly lighter shade of the stuff on top.
     
  18. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    Yeah, I would have expected that. It just doesn't sound right that the Amish would be using chromium chemicals to tan their leather. BTW chrome tanning takes about 3 days, whereas vegetable tanning (veg tan) takes about 3 weeks. With that sort of time difference you can understand why most leather is chrome tanned now days. Of course these are only two of the many ways to tan leather. The American indians tanned leather typically by smoke tanning or brain tanning. Some day, when I have nothing else to do, I'm going to try some tanning with these methods.
     
  19. Harrison

    Harrison The Best Beatle

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    Yeah, they specialize in harnesses for horses. It's quite a cool little shop they have. On the bottom floor they have all their stuff for sale and then the top floor is where they make all of there stuff so they have big racks filled with leather and then a bunch of bins filled with spots and rivets. They have automated spot and rivet setters. And then they have a big heavy sewing machine to sew leather. They also have a leather splitting machine.
     
  20. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Gamigar,
    That sounds pretty cool. Do they actually tan the leather there or nearby or do they get it from another supplier? WinstonSalen, NC, near where I live used to be a Moravian town in colonial days. It was known for, among other things, its tannery. While they have a "living history" town set up now, they don't have a tannery. They have a cobler's shop in which they make shoes and other very small projects. Not overly impressive though, sad to say!

    Those leather sewing machines save a considerable amount of time, not to mention saving your hands. BUT......they are typically quite expensive. As they are Amhish, are their sewing machines electric motor driven or hand operated? Or maybe they power them some other way, water wheel, foot treddle, ????

    I've heard that the tanning process can be/is(?) quite stinky.