Longsword Grip

Discussion in 'Historical Re-enactment' started by Gavaha, Oct 20, 2003.

  1. Gavaha

    Gavaha Art House Member

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    When you are fighting in longsword, wether you are left or right handed your hand closet to the crossgaurd should be the foot forward.

    Example: Say you have a grip of right hand closet to the crossgaurd, then your right foot should be infront of the left, slightly angling yourself. You should not have your feet at the same position. Your body should be facing more sideways than forward, for that decreases the stabable area when starting.

    In this photo found on google, the guy on the left would be a ok guy to look at, just give him a sword
     

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  2. Cudgel

    Cudgel The name says it all

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    Sorry to resurect this as its almost a year old LOL

    that is a good rule of thumb, however fo certain gaurds it is more comfotable to lead with the opposite foot( trailing or tail gaurd) and in teh other gurads it truly does not matter which foot is leading.
    And rember to slightly bend your knees.
    The advantage to having the lead foot the same as the top han dhat your body is slightly angled with eh top hands forarrd. And its more aslightly angled posistion with useing both hands in fighting not the more angled stances shown in sport fenicng the torso is more or les squared off with your target. the resoning is its uputs your sword out farther and allows you carry teh cut rhoguh throuhg from your legs.hip, torso and shoulders down to teh arms, creating my power.
     
  3. Orkin

    Orkin The Fighters Guide House Member

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    Here's some good information about (German) longsword guards:
    http://www.thehaca.com/essays/StancesIntro.htm

    As you can see, there is not necessarily a rule saying that one leg or another needs to be forward. Most important, notice that - like kenjutsu - authentic medieval guards are (generally!) "cocked and loaded" waiting positions from which powerful strikes can be launched without much "wind-up". Also, the selection of guards depends on your opponent's selection of guards, and the energy of the fight...
     
  4. Cudgel

    Cudgel The name says it all

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    actualy a abou thalf of the guards in german swrodsmanship are "cocked and loaded" the rst being eithr guards to provoct and attack or to lauch thursts froms. Granted you can start an attacks from any of the guards, but spo,e guards allow you to apply more power such as nebenhut or vom tag.
     
  5. Orkin

    Orkin The Fighters Guide House Member

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    From the low guards, you can do a dandy little snapping cut with the back edge of your sword. The German material doesn't talk about it much, but it's pretty popular in Fiore and Vadi.
     
  6. Cudgel

    Cudgel The name says it all

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    well it does talka bout useing the short edge to make cuts, from alber, low gaurd, and from seravl aothre guards but fro monly one side, because well gee im not explaining anythings well.

    MY point is, i think, that while u can launch a strong blow from low gaurds ther are other gaurds that allow you to gt a more powerful blow by using your body. In my expereince low guard only using the arms as opposed to so ay doing a high attack from high guard with whih u cann use your arms shoulders and most importanalty your hips.

    And in at least one the German manulas its state that you shoul step forward with the leg on the side you are cutting from, not quite leading with a specific leg but simlar, and there ae certaina gurads where it does mater which leg you lead with like the back or tail guard or nebenhut
     
  7. Orkin

    Orkin The Fighters Guide House Member

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    I'm getting in trouble here, because I know the Italian material a lot better than the German. My apologies if I muddy the waters. I think we're in agreement on the important stuff. :)
     
  8. Cudgel

    Cudgel The name says it all

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    lol no doubt. while there are dinfferences between the two schools thre are similarities.
     
  9. Orkin

    Orkin The Fighters Guide House Member

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    One thing we haven't discussed: Assuming that you are gripping your longsword with your right hand closest to the cross (standard right-hander action), then a low guard at your right side (say Fiore's Iron Gate) would be different from a low guard at your left side, in that a left-side guard your wrists would tend to cross. In Fiore your left-side low guard (with right foot forward) you are limited to Boar's Tooth, Half Iron Gate etc, where the sword is pointed straight ahead, rather than off the side. I think this is because Fiore involves a lot of grappling, and to a grappler, an opponent with crossed wrists is inviting a takedown...
     
  10. Cudgel

    Cudgel The name says it all

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    I think im cofused. ive spent most of yesterday pondering what you mean.
    From my understanding the three gaurds are all low gaurds to the front and none of which would actually cross the wrists. I could be mistaken its beena month sincce i last looked at Fiore's works.

    For the trailing or rear gaurds, however, when you are holding the sword on the opposite side of your body from your lead hand your wrists will cross as will the hanging gaurds from the opposite side. IIRC
     
  11. Orkin

    Orkin The Fighters Guide House Member

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    In the Full Iron Gate or Tuta porta de fero the sword is held out at a right angle to the right side. It's a pretty powerful position IMHO.
    http://www.aemma.org/onlineResources/liberi/liberi1_body.htm

    In the Tail Guard or Posta di coda lunga e distesa the sword is held out to the rear. It's similar to one from kenjutsu, and is seen used in a duel near the beginning of The Seven Samurai. I guess that's why I like it. In both of these, the wrists are not crossed.
    http://www.aemma.org/onlineResources/liberi/liberi11_body.htm

    Actually the entire Fiore material is at
    http://www.aemma.org/library_top.htm
     
  12. Cudgel

    Cudgel The name says it all

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    I am actualy familar with AEMMA as I read through all of the longsword section for Fiore.

    Iron gate is simalr to schranckthut however from my understanding there is some difference between teh two


    it is also similar to nebenhut
    sadly I am having trouble finding an online pic of the guards inquestion.

    nebenhut is also similar to tail guard.

    EDIT: Also both of these gaurds strong ones to attack from just like the two guards you showed
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2004