Is this fantasy concept boring and overused now?

Discussion in 'General Fantasy' started by 99ma99, Jul 13, 2017.

  1. 99ma99

    99ma99 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0
    The idea of royal houses/families fighting for power, which includes going to war with each other. I haven't read many fantasy stories, but that's the central theme of A Song of Ice and Fire and most medieval themed stories.
    The thing is that Asoiaf is one of the only fantasy series I've read and I love it so incredibly much, so every time I come up with an idea for my story, and have similar elements to ASOIAF, I'm always scared that I'm subconsciously copying it blindly.
    But there's a story that's popped into my head and it's escalating into something big, but a huge part of it is having to do with royal families fighting for power for the throne of a kingdom and I feel like it's been used too much and not original anymore.
     
  2. zmunkz

    zmunkz Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2015
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    Yeah, it is a bit of a running joke among fantasy writers that nobody has developed black powder. But that doesn't matter, it is a trope many people don't balk at because there is so much fascination with castles and kings, so as long as you add something interesting to the trope you'll be fine.

    If you find it too overdone, there are plenty of great fantasy books that don't use that setting. Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn series is set in more of a renaissance time period, and is otherwise a full fantasy.
     
  3. Pen

    Pen New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2017
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0 / -0
    black powder has been used in a few fantasy worlds. honestly i don't see any issue using it. as long as it has restrictions.
     
  4. SteamBoy

    SteamBoy Crazy tinkerer and alchemist

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2017
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0
    Sometimes steampunk and fantasy are mixed, so, it also justifies the use of machines, powder, electricity and even advanced machines.
    I think it was called technomagics
     
  5. Pen

    Pen New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2017
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0 / -0
    hell arcanepunk is a thing
     
  6. Meteorain

    Meteorain Magical & Mystical

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Messages:
    17,139
    Likes Received:
    150
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +150 / 0 / -0
    There is a series called Powder Mage which has gunpowder and muskets inclusive in the setting.

    This is the first book of a trilogy:

    Promise of Blood (Powder Mage, #1)

    There are some off shoot books based around the same universe.
     
  7. L. S. Blades

    L. S. Blades Indie Author, The Rings Of The Lords

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Scotland
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    I would personally say that the concept has been over used, and have never been interested in what is basically conflicts of an upper class, which I find steers away the value of a fantasy to more of a common soap/drama. From what little I watched of Asoiaf, I wasn't impressed; it gave off the impression of a pornographic rip-off of Lord Of The Rings, as emphasised in the South Park spoof version of it.

    I think it's more interesting to explore the development of early/medieval societies,including different forms of governance/power control. As per other replies; yes, the invention of black powder is almost a taboo subject within medieval fantasy worlds, but in fairness it's discovery in real life (being estimated in the 10th century), could depend on the events/populace/conditions prevalent within a fantasy world. So it could depend on the rate at which other technologies are developed, for instance. I've explored to a degree weapons development in my book, with the most modern equivalent weapon that I've drawn inspiration from being MRLS's (Multiple Rocket Launch Systems), in the form of what I named 'Volleyflukes'; a mobile, horse-drawn platform, relying on weights to preload a platform of vertical-launch archery arrow arrays (firing hundreds of arrows at a time).
     
  8. Jess Leigh

    Jess Leigh Serial Scrawler

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2017
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Tasmania, Australia
    Ratings:
    +9 / 0 / -0
    Good question. I've come across it in a lot of fantasy stories too.

    I feel like ideas that are used a lot are less of a problem for being used a lot and are more of a problem for being used in similar ways repeatedly.

    There’s a lot of space for creativity and originality when it comes to what the royal families are fighting over and how they’re fighting over it. I'd say it'd be the characters in the families that would make or break it. For me, at least.
     
  9. CelestialAeon

    CelestialAeon New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0 / -0
    A bit of a sidetrack here but if I had to pick one fantasy book that feels refreshing even after a few rereads it would be Last Light of the Sun by Guy Gavriel Kay. It combines gritty viking theme with fantasy elements and the storyline is quite distinct. I agree that the basic "gameofthronish" politics kind of thing is sort of scraped to the bone.
     
  10. S.J. Faerlind

    S.J. Faerlind Flashlight Shadowhunter

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    Messages:
    5,657
    Likes Received:
    191
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Canada
    Ratings:
    +298 / 2 / -1
    I don't think it matters that much honestly. The power hungry character(s) quest for more power/money or to keep their power/money is a central theme in almost any genre. It doesn't matter whether its a noble or royal class power struggle in medieval fantasy, a thief in a mystery, a serial killer in a horror, an invading alien race in sci fi or reading the newspaper in real life, the theme seems to be central to the human experience. Without conflict the reader can recognize and understand, there's no story, so it makes sense that power struggles would be extremely common, whatever the context of the setting.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1