Espada y Daga

Discussion in 'General Weapons & Armour' started by Forgotten Realms, Jan 22, 2012.

  1. Forgotten Realms

    Forgotten Realms Human Version of Drizzt

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    I just have the question if anybody of you is handling the Renaissance fighting art "Espada y Daga" (Sword and Dagger) originating from Spain?

    It is some kind of dual wielding system by using the dagger with the left hand to parry and cutting and the sword in the right to attack, to slit, to strike and/or to stab.

    Looking forward to opinions and experience.
     
  2. Sparrow

    Sparrow Well-Known Member

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    I've only encountered that mode of sword play once in my reading... in a book covering the history of pirates.

    The short sword, or long dagger actually had two hook-like extensions on the hilt which were used to catch the opponents cutlass and sweep it aside, thereby opening up his guard for a counter strike. It doesn't fair well against an adversary who wields a heavy sword. I'm guessing Espada y Daga is for close quarters fighting and fairly useless on an open battlefield.
     
  3. Forgotten Realms

    Forgotten Realms Human Version of Drizzt

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    It was used as a means of long, middle and close range combat. As it contained not only of techniques but of a lot of movements, it was well designed for a bladed battlefield - of course not designed for modern warfare with shooting and wide range weapons.

    Originally it was from Spain and as the Spaniards were a seafaring nation, they brought this fighting style to Asia. You can still find it applied in Philippine Kali and Escrima. In 16th Century it was adopted by the Japanese Samurai, first by Miyamoto Musashi, wielding two weapons simultaneously which was very strange for Samurai fighting art.

    And you are right, Sparrow. The first ones who used it were Spanish, Italian and German pirates and as well the nobility as sword fighting was reserved to aristocracy only at that time.