Calling all archers....

Discussion in 'General Weapons & Armour' started by Mububban, Oct 29, 2003.

  1. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Sorry, been very busy lately and not had time for play on the forum......

    Bojangles - Your arrows are going left. Are you sure you are lined up? That is, when you are in the draw position your eye sights down the shaft of the arrow. Often we tend to lean our heads into the arrow instead of anchoring such that the bow string bisects our aiming eye. If you lean in this tends to pull the arrow off one side or the other. Second thing to check is your release. I'm assuming you are a right hand shooter, bow held in the left hand, draw with the right. As such and if you are using the three finger grip, where the string rests on your fingers and how you release may cause arrows to wander right or left. First, the string should rest on the pads of your draw fingers. Not in the first knuckle groove. Next is the rlease. If you conciously release the string what happens is we pull the string, in this case, away from our face thereby pulling the back of the arrow to the right. Hence the point goes left. Now the arrow flexes right and left in the air, but will tend to hit left of the aiming point. In a good release you don't actually release the string as much as you relax your fingers to the point that the string slips off your fingers. If your hand moves from your anchor point, other than going straight back, you may be pulling the release. Try this, see if it helps. I find that when I get tired all these things creep into my technique and it goes.........well south.

    Cheesy - Pennsic. It was great as usual. I spent most of my time on the archery range. I found a vendor there who was selling horse bows - different than in previous years. I talked with him some about my reaction to horse bows - too much hand shock etc. He offered me two styles of horse bows, Mongolian and Hungarian. The Mongolian bow had little saddles of wood that the string rested in near the tips. I guess this increases the leverge of the string upon release for more snap to the release. Anyway, I took both of them up to the range and shot them. Upon return I told him the Mongolian bow, with the string rests, had more hand shock than I prefered. He said that was to be expected. However, the Hungarian bow (looks like the Kasai horse bows) was a sweet number! Fast, easy draw, very little hand shock. He said that was also to be expected, design differences. Needless to say I bought it. The limb tips are veneered with horn and the limbs are wood with fiberglass stringers in them. (The Kasai bows are fiberglass limbs.) The best part is the bow was a full $200 less than the Kasai bows!

    The other thing I did at Pennsic this year which was an absolute blast is Atylatl. Basically its throwing spears with a throwing stick. You hook the end of the spear into a point on the throwing stick. Then you throw the spear and the stick becomes an extension of your arm allowing you to throw the spear incredible distances. We had a "battle". Each person was designated by a hay bale with a piece of notebook paper on it. One hit in your bale and you were wounded. Two hits and you're dead. One hit to the paper and you're dead. One side threw, then the other. Between throws we had 10 seconds to move, our bales. I haven't had that much fun at an event since my very first event! It was a blast.
     
  2. Thingol

    Thingol New Member

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    sorry for the question, but I'm new in this. What it's the minimmum draw weight for a bow to be used as a real weapon (combat, hunting,etc.).

    Thanks...
     
  3. Cheesy Goodness

    Cheesy Goodness The Fighters Guide House Member

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    I'm not a veteran in archery, but I'll give it a shot Thingol...

    It all depends. Hopefully, the only thing you'll be shooting is deer (we dont want to shoot people now do we?). In which case, 35 -40 and above should get the job done. However, if your just getting started, a lighter bow may be a better choice. Eventually, you'll build up the needed muscles and be able to draw a 40 pounder with no problem. I started with a 45 myself, but that's only because I only had that bow, and no other. I wasn't accurate at all with it at first, but eventually I got stronger and shot better.

    Unless you're a beast and bench 500 pounds...then a heavier bow should be better ;)
     
  4. elrond243

    elrond243 The Fighters Guide House Member

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    hey i bought a mongolian horse bow and i was told to use only wood arrows with it why is that?
     
  5. Cheesy Goodness

    Cheesy Goodness The Fighters Guide House Member

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    PROBABLY (I don't know for sure) just someone's opinion...meaning it'll be more traditional. Personally, if I could get my hands on wood arrows I would, but Aluminum arrows are cheaper around here and they are more reliable when hunting. This may be the same case for you, in which case, get Aluminum.

    But just make sure that the arrow can take the poundage of the bow.

    (Maybe CoG can confirm all this...or crap all over my theory :))
     
  6. elrond243

    elrond243 The Fighters Guide House Member

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  7. Christophe of Grey

    Christophe of Grey Cordwainer to Royals

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    Thingol - For combat archery usually 30 pounds is the maximum limit for long bows. I know folks who use lighter bows but their arrows don't fly very far! As for hunting, usually you are looking at a bow in the 50 pound range minimum. That's so the arrow penitrates the target enough to do the damage neccessary. I believe each state has rules/laws regarding minimum poundage for hunting. For target archery consider how far your farthest target is going to be. If only 40 yards, a 30 pound bow works just fine. If 100 yards you may need to move up to a 50 pound bow. Most target archers use lower poundage bows as they are easier to hold the draw while aiming. Why use a 70 pound bow if you are only shooting 40 yards?

    Elrond - I have a horse bow and shoot aluminum arrows with it. Can't think of a good logical reason for using only wooden arrows. One thought is that because horse bows are not center shot bows the arrow flexes more on release. Of course any good aluminum arrow (read here, NOT purchaed at Wallmart) can take the flex. I make my own wooden arrows at a cost of about $38 per dozen. Of course I all ready have the fletching jig and glue. But considering wooden arrows are not as durable as aluminum I choose aluminum for daily practice.

    One issue that is important for good results is buy arrows that are spined about 5 - 10 greater than the poundage of your bow. That is to say, if your bow is a 30 pound bow, use 35 - 40 spine arrows. Overall, the higher the poundage, the stiffer the spine. Something to consider. Modern bow hunters use carbon arrows which are very small diameter and typically much higher spine weights. Of course the bows they are using are also much higher poundage than traditional bows. Modern bows/compound bows have a let down that allows tha archer to pull the higher weights. However, the arrow shaft has to be able to handle the higher poundage without snapping. Regardless of the type of bow, when an arrow is released it actually bends sideways as it leaves the bow. That's because all the energy that drives the arrow is delivered in one massive push at the end of the arrow. The front hasn't even started moving yet! High poundage bow, low spine arrows - expect your arrows to snap in half as they leave the bow string.
     
  8. elrond243

    elrond243 The Fighters Guide House Member

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    i picked up some easton camo hunters set for fiftey pounds, so thanks for that information. the ears on the boys are called syhas and my bow draws so quietly and smooth mine cost around 350 at king richards fair. not sure if any of you are from the massachusets regoin but thats the renisance fiar there. archery in my opion is the most constructive form of work out i can think of when i started archery last year i couldn't draw twenty pounds now i can draw a seventy pound compound. and christophe of grey earlier when you said the carbon arrows were the heavyest i disagree i think wood is much heavier for the same poundage. and at my highschool i'm trying to make an archery club what do you think that would take?