Banning books

Discussion in 'General Books' started by Harrison, Dec 3, 2003.

  1. Dystopia Eternal

    Dystopia Eternal The Windbringer

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    We are supposed to have freedom of speech/expression, but to paraphrase a great man, freedom is the most precious possesion of the imagination. Haha i hope they ban more books so i can read them
     
  2. Taiba

    Taiba The last Marag

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    Last edited: Jan 7, 2004
  3. Radagast

    Radagast Art House Member

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    Interesting to note:

    Seems a rather stupid reason. I have read plenty of books (in and out of school) that had language far beyond this. Rather funny if you ask me.
     
  4. Taiba

    Taiba The last Marag

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    I guess that was kind of what I was getting at. It's all just completely pointless. I was lucky that my school wasn't like this, in fact my freshman year "Lord of the Flies" was required reading, and I've seen it on banned book lists, too. But when school's and other organizations cater to the idiocy of a select few...I would laugh, too, if it weren't so...so...disappointing.
     
  5. HaldirofLorien

    HaldirofLorien Member

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    Banning books is just stupid . end of story , just like banning films and songs.
     
  6. Khamul

    Khamul Roaming

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    Well, many parents don't want their students reading books that have that kind of language in it anyways.
     
  7. Radagast

    Radagast Art House Member

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    True enough. But its not like the parents can prevent the language from coming from other sources ex: T.V., Internet, Walking down the street. It's probabley more detramental for the students not to read the book, than to read the book with bad language in it. With the dropping rates that younger generations read, I would hate to see one not read a book just because of some words that they most likely are exposed to on a daily basis.
     
  8. matrix9217

    matrix9217 King of the Mark

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    Im lucky, my district doesnt ban any books. In fact, we have a banned book month, when we read banned books.
     
  9. Khamul

    Khamul Roaming

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    Radagast, just because something is out there and will eventually come your way, doesn't mean that you still want to expose your child to it, especially in what you thought to be a sterile environment. On a lesser scale, maybe a parent doesn't want their child looking at pornography or reading sexually oriented books, and a teacher assigs a topic upon the book "Flowers for Argoran." (Or something to that extent, my friend had to read the book; and, he said it was extremely graphic.) It's basically a retarted person's sexual exploits.. In that instance, should a book be banned? When an author addresses a subject that is pretty much 'voodoo' or clearly offensive to some.

    (Also, I assume for F451 that the parent was very religious, and there is a good chance that the child's exposure to media at the home would be almost none.)
     
  10. Radagast

    Radagast Art House Member

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    Yes, in those instances I would agree. But when a book is banned because it has the line 'God Damn' in it, I find it such a small and trivial matter for parents to be concerned about. There's almost no escape to crude language in society today regardless of parent restrictions.

    But for the most part, I can agree with what you said.
     
  11. Skyanide

    Skyanide The Big Meanie Staff Member

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    Fahrenheit 451 is an awesome book, and it's rather ironic that the book is banned seeing that one of the messages of the book is about book censorship.

    I don't believe in book censorship, but I do believe in restricting books to children that are not "age appropriate".

    I read Fahrenheit 451 in Grade 9 or 10. it is a big part of why I love science fiction today. Bradbury, Orwell, John Wyndham, Arthur C. Clarke
     
  12. Loki the Demon

    Loki the Demon "Belgium, Man!"

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    wait a minute, back up here, what kind of philistine would ban HUCKELBERRY FINN!!!!??? It's a classic!!! Sure, it shows how Black's were treated in slave times and all that, but I felt that was more critical of white people than it was detrimental to black people. Besides, Huck has a sort of epiphiny when he puts freeing Jim above everything he's been taught is right. ( i haven't read uncle toms cabin, but i gather it's the same kind of deal?)
     
  13. jake1964

    jake1964 Old enough to be your dad

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    You are right Loki. According to the society of the time, it was morally wrong for Huck not to turn Jim in. When Huck realizes how important Jim's friendship is to him, in spite of the color of Jim's skin, he says to himself; "well I'll just go to hell then.". The character of Huck Finn was voicing Samuel Clemens own opinion of slavery. The language used in the book must be used to accurately depict the time it is presenting. You can not make it politically correct without changing the readers perception of the time period.
    IMO most people who think they want to ban a book have never read the book they want to ban. They will read a passage or a word taken out of context and form their opinion. They then go out spreading their disinformation. They are always able to find enough sheep who would rather someone else do their thinking for them. Then you end up with a mindless mob with an uninformed moron as their spokesman. Naturally the mass media is always willing to give these idiots a forum to speak from. Then, Joe Blow down the street sees it on the news and joins the bandwagon. After all, They must be right or they wouldn't be on the national news. YEAH, RIGHT! :puke: