Acacia trilogy

Discussion in 'General Books' started by cmilan, May 8, 2019.

  1. cmilan

    cmilan New Member

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    Hi! Anyone here who read the Acacia Trilogy by David Anthony Dutham? The reviews and ratings for the books were great so I started reading them. I think I started reading the 1st book (the war with the mein) 4-5 times. Everytime I would start reading it, I lose interest real fast. I finally finished reading it last week(just the 1st book) and I was sorely disappointed. Durham’s way of writing was different. For me, he favors narrating conversations than actually writing their dialogues and exchanges which I found boring. The Akaran children’s characters were built quite shallowly for me. Example, Mena trained in sword fighting for only 3 months then she was able to defeat fighters, who fought in wars all their lives, quite easily. I find that hard to accept.
    So anyway, to anyone who has read the whole trilogy? Will the story line get better? Will the characters be more believable? Should I read the 2nd and 3rd books?
     
  2. TirelessSeven

    TirelessSeven Active Member

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    Haven't read it. To tell the truth, I hadn't even heard of it before reading your post, cmilan. I had to google. The reviews for it are certainly positive and (now I know it exists) I'll probably give it a go. Sounds like the kind of thing I like.
    I know what you mean about narrated conversations, though. Some writers tend to overuse it when they're not confident writing dialogue. I'm fine with it when it's used to skip over mundane things, like pleasantries (hellos, goodbyes, etc) and everyday small-talk. Don't need to see the conversation x and y have about the weather, the author telling me they did is sufficient, providing it's relevant to the story (don't want to hear about it at all otherwise). But I prefer to get the important stuff first-hand.
    Also, if the characters/character-arcs are as shallow as you describe, I probably won't like the book anyway. I'd have a difficult time believing that someone could become a master bread-maker in three months, never mind a master with the sword. Can't handle that sort of stuff. Individuals with exceptional talent can exist (I'm fairly sure I believe that), but when everyone in the story is freakishly skillful, it doesn't do anything for me.

    If I ever do get round to reading the books, I'll let you know what I think. Was there anything you did like about the first one?

    P.S - Didn't mean to disparage bakers (or baking). It probably does take a life-time to learn every aspect of bread-making.
     
  3. cmilan

    cmilan New Member

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    I did like the story, not very original but there are certain mystery points that pushes me to actually read the rest of the books for peace of mind. If you have read a song of ice and fire, the acacia trilogy has similarities with regard to how the stark children’s characters or story lines develop.

    Thank you for the reply. Please do tell me if the 2nd and 3rd books are worth reading.
     
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